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Review of The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell

September 1, 2014

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell
Random House
Publication Date: September 2, 2014

41jvRhAfcHL._SL250_The story begins in Gravesend, England in the year 1984 when we are introduced to our main protagonist and heroine, Holly Sykes.

Holly is 15 years old and lives with her parents and siblings. Holly’s mother finds out that Holly’s new boyfriend is 24 years old and she forbids Holly from seeing him anymore. Holly decides that she will run away from home and go have this wonderful romantic life with boyfriend Vinnie. At least that was the plan.

As she is packing to leave, her odd, prescient little brother Jacko comes to her room to say goodbye. He seems to be giving her strange advice and gives her a little cardboard cutout with a handmade drawing of a labyrinth, instructing her to memorize it. She thinks it all strange but promises him she will.

When she was younger, Holly had envisioned strange people talking to her and called them “the radio people.” Her parents had taken her to a psychiatrist named Dr. Marinus and he had calmed their fears and told them that this was normal for someone her age and after seeing this doctor, Holly doesn’t hear or see them anymore. That is until after the fight with her mother about the boyfriend when she runs away from home and begins to suffer these voices and weird psychic experiences all over again.

The book is divided into sections (by time) and this one ends with a tragic event that changes Holly’s life and those near and dear to her.

This is when I proceed with extra caution with the summary without giving away any spoilers. I think it’s important to find out about events and learn facts just as the author intended.

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BookBalloon Links for August 19, 2014

August 19, 2014
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Books We’re Loving – August 15, 2014

August 15, 2014
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Sunday Links, August 10, 2014 | Like Fire

August 11, 2014

Looking for something to read? Every Sunday, Terry Weyna publishes a bookish link round-up at Like Fire. Here’s a taste:

What to Read Next

John Scalzi lists his favorite books about epidemics.  I’m surprised he left out Mira Grant’s Newsfeed Trilogy — but maybe he classifies those more as zombie novels than novels about epidemics.  But if that’s the case, how come he included Max Brooks’s World War Z?  Still, it’s hard to argue with his choices; Stephen King’s The Stand may be the best book ever written about an epidemic.

io9 has a terrific list of ten novels that will make you more passionate about science.  It would be easy to double the size of that list, I think.  Add the novels of Richard Powers, for instance maybe Plowing the Dark would be a good place to start, or some of Marge Piercy’s work like He, She and It, or a novel or two by Margaret Drabble — The Peppered Moth, perhaps.

via Sunday Links, August 10, 2014 | Like Fire.

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The Circle of Life of a Librarian, and a Library.

August 10, 2014

In the discussion about modern libraries, (Bookstores and Libraries) some posters talked of not being happy with the big, tomb-like libraries that were short on books and long on technology; the experience felt more like an airport then a pleasant place to visit and browse and even read. It made me think of my first experience in a library, and how much it meant to me, and made me wonder if in our rush to make libraries more modern, we have lost something in the process.

When I was a little girl, my parents owned a deli. In order to keep me from getting under foot on the weekends, they’d send me across the street to the main library. There I was taken under the wing of a wonderful librarian named Priscilla McCloud. Along with keeping me out of trouble, she was the one who really started my life-long love of books. (I have always had my suspicions that my parents paid her in pastrami sandwiches to take care of their urchin for a few hours.) She helped me learn to read, and encouraged me to be a better reader by handing me books that were just a little too hard for me. I loved the challenge! I soon learned the joy of getting totally lost in a book.  She loved talking about the books I was reading, often suggesting books that led from the one I had just read, something I still do when I am looking for something new to read.  That path, that spider’s web we readers always seem to happily fall into, was well-trod by the time the deli was gone and we had moved far away.

Over the years of growing up, amongst family turmoil and trouble at school, our branch library was always a place of safety and security, one where I could lose myself for a while, one where I could always find some kind person to help me find a book, an author, or just some information for a school assignment. I found other ways to keep busy but still regularly visited. I spent many happy hours browsing the shelves for a stack of books that I carried uncomplaining a mile away to my home.  I lost track of Priscilla, but never forgot her. When I started high school, I was delighted to see her again, working at the branch library not far from campus. She remembered me, and every time I visited she would ask me what I was doing in school and what I was reading. She was often busy but took the time to talk about the books I was reading and suggest others. When I went off to college, I made sure to stop by and visit when I came home for vacation. After I graduated, I lost track of her again.

Fast forward to the year 2000. I had just gotten online and found the Atlantic‘s Table Talk, a site where bibliophiles could talk about books.  I was in heaven! I never knew there were so many people like me, I felt like a little girl again, being guided and encouraged by others to books and authors I never have imagined existed. When the subject of how we got started in reading came up, I told my story about Priscilla. I was shocked when one of the posters asked me a few questions, and told me that my dear librarian was her godmother! Priscilla was in a nursing home, not doing all that well.  When the godchild mentioned my name to her, she didn’t seem to remember it, but smiled when she heard the story. Since this was before I knew anything about social media, I didn’t think of asking for her address but it doesn’t matter. I still think of her in these days of Facebook and Twitter, when I can talk online with other readers about the books we read or want to read. That’s what Bookballoon site is all about.  Connecting readers like me who don’t want to lose the spark that Priscilla McCloud planted so long ago.

I still think of Priscilla when I visit libraries today. My branch library has been remodeled so that the shelves are far from each other in different locations, almost hiding the fact that many of the older books have disappeared. A friend of mine, a long time library volunteer, finally quit in despair over how many books were being discarded. There is no one at a reference desk, and one librarian available to help with the computer kiosks we now use to check out books. I know the world has changed (and in this day and age, any parent that would send their six year old across a busy street to the library by herself would be in a world of hurt! ); I know that libraries must change to keep running. But can a library still be designed to be that welcoming, safe, secure place of learning that I remember? And will there still be people there who will take the time for kids like me – in the way, out of sorts, who just need some encouragement and guidance? I have to be optimistic and think that the love of books will continue to be passed on, in a different way perhaps that I could ever imagine. And that surely Priscilla would be smiling.

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BookBalloon Links for August 9, 2014

August 9, 2014
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You Start a Conversation, We’ll Finish It

August 7, 2014

It’s August, but we are not French (except maybe in our SOULS) so here we all are as per usual.PourLire

  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory goes in an…interesting…direction cover Art (of the Book)-wise.
  • More cover coverage: we’re judging the cover by the cover and replacing movie tie-in covers (yuck) on our Book Shelves with the classic covers we remember. Cover, cover, cover! It doesn’t even sound like a word any more!
  • Blinky page-turns in E-Readers: a feature or a bug?
  • What Are You Reading? Donna Tartt? Defend your choice! No, not really. But sort of!
  • The joys and challenges of those big, fat photo sections in Biographies, Autobiographies, and Memoirs.
  • Quick poll on Maggie Gyllenhaal’s staring style in her new TV show The Honorable Woman: compelling or vacuous? One vote per household.
  • Sweet omelets and cucumbers! It’s the new “in” exclamation. “Oh my stars and garters!” is sooo 1910. No, really, it’s just Culinary (Arts).
  • Also all the rage: tortoiseshell Pets.
  • Movies about Robert Altman’s boyhood starring Grace Zabriskie and Goldie Hawn. (I may have been skimming this discussion a little.)
  • People who like Sports are Talking about this made-up baseball word: “TOOTBLAN.” TOOTBLAN, TOOTBLAN, TOOTBLAN. Cover!
  • One of those things that is…are…umm…one of the things up with which I will not put is…well, I mean, if you think less…I mean fewer…”What if”,…no only British people do quotes like that…is passive voice showing or telling or both…is that why Chekhov’s Gun…anyway…I mean GRAMMAR, right?
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The September 2014 Indie Next List Great Reads

August 6, 2014

Here’s a preview of the September 2014 Indie Next List:

The Bone Clocks Cover#1 Pick: The Bone Clocks: A Novel, by David Mitchell
(Random House, 9781400065677, $30)
“Once again, Mitchell’s inventiveness and imagination prove to be nothing short of genius. He combines dark fantasy, boldly original prose, and finely drawn characters who will keep the reader riveted from Holly Sykes’ initial angst-ridden teen thought to the very last, hopeful sentence. Mitchell proves once again that he is a writer of no equal when it comes to the invention of language, place, and time, taking the reader to the edge of both the real and the imagined as if he were guiding you personally by the hand. I will not have to persuade anyone into enjoying The Bone Clocks!” —Javier Ramirez, City Lit Books, Chicago, IL

Station Eleven CoverStation Eleven, by Emily St. John Mandel
(Knopf, 9780385353304, $24.95)
“This is a harrowing and wonderful book — blunt and elegant, wise and frightening, and utterly plausible at every turn. The characters are complicated, but their stories, short or long, are always deeply engaging. We — our species — always find ways, little by little, not just to survive but also to reestablish a sense of place, of community, and of compassion. Unsentimental yet deeply moving, Station Eleven is a terrific achievement.” —John Christensen, Arcadia Books, Spring Green, WI

Neverhome CoverNeverhome: A Novel, by Laird Hunt
(Little, Brown, 9780316370134, $26)
“Leaving her beloved husband behind to tend their Indiana farm, Constance Thompson binds her breasts and dons men’s clothing to become Ash, nicknamed ‘Gallant Ash’ by her fellow Union soldiers. With spare, poetic, transcendent prose, Hunt portrays the horror of the Civil War and the fallout from the trauma experienced by soldiers, their families, and the country at large. Ash is a fascinating and enigmatic character, keeping secrets from everyone she encounters and keeping the reader enthralled as her shocking story unfolds. Neverhome will surely join the ranks of the brilliant novels not just of the Civil War, but of war writ large.” —Cathy Langer, Tattered Cover Book Store, Denver, CO

We Are Not Ourselves CoverWe Are Not Ourselves, by Matthew Thomas
(Simon & Schuster, 9781476756660, $28)
“This is simply the most perfect, brilliantly written novel I have read in a long time! Suspenseful, full of heartwarming moments of lightness and love intertwined with dark moments of foreboding, it is the story of a marriage, a family, and the struggle to attain the American Dream. Most of all, it is the story of Eileen Leary, the daughter of Irish immigrants, and her unwavering strength, love, loyalty, and hopes for herself, her husband, Ed, and their son, Connell. The novel spans from 1951 to 2011 and is set primarily in New York, but the unexpected tragedy that befalls the Learys could happen in any town in any country. Immensely moving and thought-provoking!” —Maria Roden, Orinda Books, Orinda, CA

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Ron Charles: The book tour, supercharged

August 4, 2014

Jodi Picoult

Would you pay $95 to meet an author? What if the event included a manicure, tote bag, and, of course, the writer’s latest book? Ron Charles of the Washington Post covers the newest literary phenomenon: The “supercharged” book tour –

We’ll see an example of this supercharged literary extravaganza on Wednesday when Jodi Picoult comes to the Mead Center in Southwest Washington. The presentation, co-hosted by Random House and Good Housekeeping, offers fans a buffet dinner with wine, a chocolate tasting, live music and dancing, manicures, a fashion preview curated by Talbots, a tote bag and a very early copy — signed, of course — of Picoult’s upcoming novel, “Leaving Time.”

Clearly, this is no ordinary bookstore reading. But it all comes at no ordinary cost: $95 per person.

via The book tour, supercharged – The Washington Post.

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Books We’re Loving – August 4, 2014

August 4, 2014
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Product Search

The NYRB Reading Club

Speedboat by Renata Adler

Speedboat

"When Speedboat burst on the scene in the late ’70s it was like nothing readers had encountered before. It seemed to disregard the rules of the novel, but it wore its unconventionality with ease. Reading it was a pleasure of a new, unexpected kind." -- New York Review Books

John Leonard said, "Nobody writes better prose than Renata Adler." What do you think? The discussion begins May 15 in the Forum.

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